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Creating Living and Learning Community on a Diverse College Campus

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DOI: 10.23977/aetp.2020.41002 | Downloads: 10 | Views: 465

Author(s)

Xiaoyuan Wang 1

Affiliation(s)

1 Shanghai University of Engineering and Science, Shanghai 201600, China. Email: [email protected]

Corresponding Author

Xiaoyuan Wang

ABSTRACT

In order to provide a well-rounded education for college students, diversity on campus plays an important role. Establishing an environment which broadens a student’s perspective has been determined by universities and colleges by increasing the amounts of diversity among their campuses. In order for students to gain a diverse education and benefit, the institution must support and believe the benefits of a diverse education as well by providing support for diversity on campus through its programs and activities. This study focus on creating a living and learning community designed for targeted groups on a diverse college campus, which creating an environment outside of the classroom for students taking a common course and live in close physical proximity, increases interactions outside of classes. A living-learning community instills a sense of belonging, foster an appreciation and understanding of diversity, and provide skills to enhance student ability to effectively work with diverse individuals. We propose a systematic and careful documentation and evaluation process of the program from beginning to end which evaluate what effect this program has on participants and whether and how dialogue achieves desired goals.

KEYWORDS

Diversity, living and learning community, intergroup dialogue, sense of belonging, critical thinking, ethnocentrism

CITE THIS PAPER

Xiaoyuan Wang. Creating Living and Learning Community on a Diverse College Campus. Advances in Educational Technology and Psychology (2020) 4: 12-18. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.23977/aetp.2020.41002.

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