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An Analysis of Cultural Differences in Death Education between China and the West

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DOI: 10.23977/trance.2023.050802 | Downloads: 20 | Views: 291

Author(s)

Yiru Ma 1

Affiliation(s)

1 Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China

Corresponding Author

Yiru Ma

ABSTRACT

Death is a common topic, in early 2020, the COVID-19 epidemic revealed the frailty and impermanence of life. Death education refers to courses and activities that explore death--the experiences, meanings, and attitudes toward it. The differences between Chinese and Western death education are mainly embodied in the arrangements of death education curriculum and the acceptance of the subject of death. This article analyzed the valuable enlightenment of Chinese and Western thanatopsis on medical development and social reality on the premise of keeping the balance of universality and diversity of death ethics. It is hoped that through the discussion of the topic, we can live more meaningfully and apply what we have learned to our daily life.

KEYWORDS

Chinese and Western cultural ideology, death sense, death education

CITE THIS PAPER

Yiru Ma, An Analysis of Cultural Differences in Death Education between China and the West. Transactions on Comparative Education (2023) Vol. 5: 6-11. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.23977/trance.2023.050802.

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