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Safety Climate and Safety Performance Management for Improved Road Safety Practices in the transport sector

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DOI: 10.23977/jceup.2020.020101 | Downloads: 14 | Views: 920

Author(s)

S. Keffane 1

Affiliation(s)

1 Department of Psychology, University Setif 2, Setif, Algeria.

Corresponding Author

S. Keffane

ABSTRACT

Road accidents in the World in recent years leave much to be desired. Road accidents have become an international canker eating deep into the core fabric of peoples’ lives. Safety climate among organizations could play an important role in increasing road safety. This study tests the proposition that the organizational climate-behavior relationship is based primarily on extrinsic Safety Performance Management induced by climate perceptions. Using safety climate as exemplar, the effect of climate-induced extrinsic Safety Performance was compared with that of engagement-induced intrinsic Safety Performance Management on Improved Road Safety Practices in the transport sector and subsequent injury outcomes. Using a sample of Bus and truck drivers representing 290 employees, (individual-level) safety climate perceptions and employee engagement predicted safety Performance Management, which mediated their effect on subsequently measured road injury outcomes. Consistent with mea-analytic evidence suggesting a non-symmetric compensatory relationship between extrinsic and intrinsic Safety Performance Management on the transport sector. The results of this study would help the concerned transport sector in improving their ability to assess the road safety indicators and to the future development of the safety performance management for road safety practices in transport sector.

KEYWORDS

Safety climate; Safety performance; Safety management; Safety behavior; Road Safety practices.

CITE THIS PAPER

S. Keffane. Safety Climate and Safety Performance Management for Improved Road Safety Practices in the transport sector. Journal of Civil Engineering and Urban Planning (2020) Vol. 2: 1-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.23977/jceup.2020.020101.

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